Kim Yong Chol gives and Donald Trump a letter from Kim Jong-un. Picture: White House
Kim Yong Chol gives and Donald Trump a letter from Kim Jong-un. Picture: White House

Kim’s letter to Trump is enormous

KIM Jong-un has sent a historic personal letter to Donald Trump and it is making BIG news for all the wrong reasons.

The Sun reports that while political commentators wondered what was actually written inside the envelope, many were also asking why was it so huge in the first place.

Kim Yong Chol gives and Donald Trump a letter from Kim Jong-un. Picture: White House
Kim Yong Chol gives and Donald Trump a letter from Kim Jong-un. Picture: White House

 

North Korean official Kim Yong Chol hand-delivered the overly large letter from the "Glorious Leader" to the US President at a special ceremony on Friday.

The Republican leader promptly described the massive message as "very nice" and "very interesting" during a meeting in the Oval Office.

However, when the White House released photos of its delivery they quickly sent social media into meltdown.

Many are now asking will Trump - who never likes to be outdone - send back an even bigger letter and, if so, where will it end.

RELATED: Trump confirms US-Korea summit

Kim Yong Chol gives and Donald Trump a letter from Kim Jong-un. Picture: White House
Kim Yong Chol gives and Donald Trump a letter from Kim Jong-un. Picture: White House

And others wondered if the giant envelope had been specifically sent to highlight the President's tiny hands.

James Kosur said: "I'm 100 per cent convinced that Kim Jong-un gave Donald Trump this unusually large letter to highlight the President's very small hands."

While Markus Ponto wrote: "The giant #letter for 'Trump is first rate trolling, making his tiny hands looking ridiculous small #TrumpKimSummit.

And Cheryl Wevill said: "Watching the news and saw the photo of Donald Trump and N. Korean representative Kim yun chul, where Kim handed Trump a letter written by Kim Jung Un personally.

"Did you see how big it was? Probably deliberately to show off Trumps tiny hands."

US President Donald Trump, left, and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. Picture: AP
US President Donald Trump, left, and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. Picture: AP

As for what this giant letter contained, well, we just don't know just yet and immediately after the meeting, Trump told reporters he had not yet read the letter.

But a White House official has since confirmed that the President has read the contents of the giant envelope.

The letter was "carefully examined" by the Secret Service for anything potentially dangerous before the North Korean official was able to deliver it, according to a White House official.

Although there is no confirmation as to what the note says it will likely mention the nuke summit in Singapore on June 12.

Mr Trump told reporters that it was an "interesting letter" but then a few minutes later said he had not read it yet.

Earlier it was revealed that historic summit with Kim was back on track following the meeting with the North Korean envoy.

Mr Trump made the announcement, just a week after he cancelled the summit after an hour-long meeting with Chol.

"We're going to deal," Mr Trump told reporters moments after the meeting ended.

"I think you're going to have a very positive result in the end. We will see what we will see."

Mr Trump had withdrawn from the summit which was due to take place in Singapore with a strongly worded letter of his own, citing "tremendous anger and open hostility" by Pyongyang.

By the next day, he was signalling the event could be back on after a conciliatory response from North Korea.

Chol was greeted at the White House by chief of staff John Kelly and then whisked into the Oval Office.

US President Donald Trump talks with Kim Yong Chol, former North Korean military intelligence chief and one of leader Kim Jong Un's closest aides. Picture: AP
US President Donald Trump talks with Kim Yong Chol, former North Korean military intelligence chief and one of leader Kim Jong Un's closest aides. Picture: AP

He is the most senior North Korean to visit the White House in 18 years, a highly symbolic sign of easing tensions after fears of war escalated amid North Korean nuclear and missile tests last year.

Questions remain about what a deal on the North's nuclear weapons would look like though Mr Trump said on Friday he believed that Kim would agree to denuclearisation.

US defence and intelligence experts have repeatedly assessed the communist state to be on the threshold of having the capability to strike anywhere in the continental US with a nuclear-tipped missile.

Mike Pompeo said he believed the country's leaders are "contemplating a path forward where they can make a strategic shift, one that their country has not been prepared to make before."

US President Donald Trump, centre, accompanied by former North Korean military intelligence chief Kim Yong Chol, left, greets Kim Song Hye, Head of the Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea of the Korean Workers' Party outside the Oval Office. Picture: AP
US President Donald Trump, centre, accompanied by former North Korean military intelligence chief Kim Yong Chol, left, greets Kim Song Hye, Head of the Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea of the Korean Workers' Party outside the Oval Office. Picture: AP

Yet he also said a news conference that difficult work remains including hurdles that may appear to be insurmountable as negotiations progress on the US demand for North Korea's complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearisation.

Despite the upbeat message in the US, Kim Jong-un, in a meeting with Russia's foreign minister on Thursday, complained about the US trying to spread its influence in the region, a comment that may complicate the summit.

North Korea's flurry of diplomatic activity following an increase in nuclear weapons and missile tests in 2017 suggests that Kim is eager for sanctions relief to build his economy and for the international legitimacy a summit with Mr Trump would provide.

Chol is the most senior North Korean visitor to the United States since Vice Marshal Jo Myong Rok visited Washington in 2000 to meet President Bill Clinton and Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.

US President Donald Trump's Chief of Staff John Kelly accompanied by an interpreter, speaks to members of the media before the arrival of former North Korean military intelligence chief Kim Yong Chol at the White House. Picture: AP
US President Donald Trump's Chief of Staff John Kelly accompanied by an interpreter, speaks to members of the media before the arrival of former North Korean military intelligence chief Kim Yong Chol at the White House. Picture: AP

That was the last time the two sides, which are technically at war, attempted to arrange a leadership summit.

It was an effort that ultimately failed as Mr Clinton's time in office ran out, and relations turned sour again after George W Bush took office in early 2001 with a tough policy on the North.

Chol, vice chairman of the North Korean ruling party's central committee, was allowed into the United States despite being on a US sanctions list.

And North Korean officials are not normally allowed to travel outside the New York area.

This article originally appeared in The Sun and is republished here with permission


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