Council workers given free nicotine patches to quit smoking

COUNCIL workers are receiving free counselling and nicotine patches to help them quit smoking - and other blue-collar businesses in Toowoomba can sign up.

Queensland Health's new Workplace Quit Smoking Program was taken up by council a month ago and 13 staff members and contractors are already involved.

The program is also extended to family members of those registered.

One spouse has enrolled in the quitting campaign.

"People who join the program receive quit resources, regular counselling support and free nicotine replacement therapy products (patches, gum or lozenges) across a 12-week period," a spokesman said.

"Once people register, a Quitline counsellor will call at a nominated time to discuss the person's smoking habits and develop a quitting plan.

"They will talk about habits and routines around smoking, provide tips for managing cravings and advice on products to help with quitting.

"There is no cost to ratepayers."

The program is specifically tailored to blue-collar workplaces.

To find out how to register a workplace go to or call 13 17 48.

Topics:  addiction council health nicotine quit smoking smoking ban toowoomba toowoomba regional council

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