BUSH TRAGEDY: Monto range  Neil Teague was found dead in the Coominglah State Forest on Saturday afternoon after he fell from a cliff. The bushman was well-known for his love of fishing.
BUSH TRAGEDY: Monto range Neil Teague was found dead in the Coominglah State Forest on Saturday afternoon after he fell from a cliff. The bushman was well-known for his love of fishing.

Bushman's body found at cliff base

IT'S a sad twist of irony that Neil Teague died in a place he knew so well - the bush.

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Moonford Management Unit ranger in charge was found in the Coominglah State Forest on Saturday afternoon.

Mr Teague, who resided in Moonford, was reported missing on late Thursday afternoon last week after he failed to meet a work colleague at a designated pick-up point while undertaking field work.

Mr Teague, who was married with two children, was in radio contact with his colleague at about 5.30pm prior to going missing.

About 50 searchers and the AGL Search and Rescue helicopter scoured the forest for a sign of Mr Teague on Friday and the search crew was more than doubled to 108 on Saturday.

Monto SES local controller Graham Radel said searchers combed an area of 4km by 6km in the forest until the grim discovery was made near Hurdle Gully Road at about 3pm.

Queensland Police said they believed Mr Teague fell about 8m from a cliff in rough terrain.

Mr Teague was carrying a mobile phone, handheld radio, a GPS unit, a compass and it is believed an EPIRB.

Police are currently undertaking investigations and a report will be prepared for the coroner.

Monto newsagent John MacElroy described Neil as “a real top bloke”.

“He enjoyed his job and was a good bushman - he taught people a lot of things about the bush; he only had to be asked,” Mr MacElroy said.

Mr MacElroy shared a love of fishing with Mr Teague, who were both members of the Cania Fish Stocking Association.

“His love of fishing was second to none - he liked all types: fly fishing lures; bait, you name it Neil was up to trying it.

“Bass was what he fished for in the beginning but with the taste of catching barra his fishing program changed.

“Neil told me that he never ate freshwater fish but he sure loved catching them.

“In his own way Neil did a lot for tourism and fishing over the 15 years that I knew him and I know that the Fish Stocking Association will certainly miss him and his contribution,” Mr MacElroy said.

Friend David Mundt said Mr Teague was well liked by the Monto community.

“He was a great mate,” Mr Mundt said.

“Neil always wanted to take people fishing whether it was bass, barra or his latest love for salt water fish species. Neil always loved a good joke,” Mr Mundt said.

Chalmers Retravision owner Ross Chalmers said Mr Teague was one of the first to help out if anyone was injured or went missing in the park.

“He would be in boots and all.

“He knew the countryside very well,” Mr Chalmers said.


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