Greg Lang (sixth from left) and his supporters ready to leave Moura and join the Burrumbuttock Hay Run. Photo Stacey Rudd / Central Telegraph
Greg Lang (sixth from left) and his supporters ready to leave Moura and join the Burrumbuttock Hay Run. Photo Stacey Rudd / Central Telegraph Stacey Rudd

Burrumbuttock Hay Runners smash record

MOURA truckie Greg Lang was a sole driver when he took part in the Burrumbuttock Hay Run in January, joining up with a much larger convoy as they delivered donated hay to drought-stricken farmers in Queensland's west.

This time he brought company.

"We had nine drivers in our group - we came from Moura, two from Rockhampton, a couple from Gladstone, a bloke from Duaringa, one from Baralaba, one from Eidsvold," said Mr Lang.

This time the Hay Runners numbered 258 trucks and 406 trailers, more than doubling the January run's total and almost tripling the amount of hay delivered (from 5000 to 14000 bales).

"I rounded a few people up this time, but mostly after I did the last run people contacted me," said Mr Lang.

"The first thing they said was that if we go again, they wanted to be involved," he said.

The group went from Moura to Muckadilla to Murgon, then on through Wondai and Kingaroy before meeting up with the convoy at Wyandra.

From there, the truckies headed out to Ilfracombe, where most of the hay was unloaded for grateful farmers.

Mr Lang and a few dozen more drivers then volunteered to go even further out to Winton to unload hay there, in order to help people who had driven in from places like Boulia.

The Burrumbuttock Hay Run has gone from strength to strength in recent months, growing in size with every iteration and garnering massive media coverage and national goodwill.

Founder Brendan Farrell did the first run in 2013 and shows no sign of stopping any time soon, already setting the next destination for the hay runners as Thargomindah in south-west Queensland.

When the truck drivers talk about the reception they get, it's easy to see why.

"It was awesome stuff I tell you," Mr Lang said.

"It's not just about getting hay to (people in the west), it's also about getting the word out there.

"The drought's not over. It's still really bad out there."

Cash donations for the next hay run can be made via the Rotary Club of Sydney.


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